Texas and Climate Change

by Kathleen Sgamma, President on September 1, 2017 - 11:47am

We at Western Energy Alliance, like most Americans, have watched with horror as Hurricane Harvey has wreaked havoc in southeastern Texas. Our thoughts are with the victims, and we like countless others are donating and encouraging others to do so. We have a special connection to Houston as many of our members work and live there. We’ve been impressed with the resilience of Texans and Louisianans as they work together to overcome the damage.

But it was inevitable. Anytime there’s a natural disaster, the media and climate change advocates will use it to spin alarmism about climate change, and Hurricane Harvey was no different. Never mind that the actual science reflected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) does not support the conclusion that natural disasters can be blamed on climate change, and that actual data show hurricanes are in a relatively quiet cycle, well within natural historical variability.

This time, however, the rhetoric took a nasty turn, with many pundits, climate change advocates, and mainstream media implying that Houston got what it deserves as the headquarters for America’s oil and natural gas industry. Forget the fact that the biggest stories from Harvey by far were the heroic rescue efforts of private citizens and communities coming together to care for each other, even standing in long lines patiently waiting to volunteer

    

But I’ll take their line of logic and run with it for just a minute. Let’s “blame” the oil and natural gas industry. If so, we need to blame the industry for being the single biggest solution for climate change to date. Our industry’s huge success delivering an abundant, affordable supply of natural gas has resulted in extensive fuel switching in the electricity sector. The low-carbon electricity generation that we make possible is the number one reason the United States has reduced greenhouse gas emissions more than any other country. We’re the primary reason U.S. greenhouse gas emissions are down 14% since 2016.


Source: Carbon Brief

That is real leadership on climate change, not virtue signaling through international treaties or confusing weather with climate. We “Texans” and all of us in the oil and natural gas industry will take the credit.